tsmithjohnson (tsmithjohnson) wrote,
tsmithjohnson
tsmithjohnson

ANCESTRY ANTHOLOGY PREVIEW #5: NOTEWORTHY NEWS ARTICLE #2: LEN KUBIAK-HOW TEXAS GOT ITS NAME

THE ORIGIN OF THE NAME IS PRESENTED IN THIS ARTICLE BY MR. KUBIAK....I WAS AWARE OF MOST OF THIS HISTORY; BUT, NOT AWARE OF ITS AMERICAN INDIAN ORIGIN....SO, I DECIDED TO FOCUS ON A PREVIEW OF THE

Hasinai Confederacy



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Welcome to Len Kubiak's Texas History Series

HOW TEXAS GOT ITS NAME



The "Texas" state name originates with the Caddo Indian word "teysha" meaning "friends". Texas comes from the Hasinai Confederacy (a large confederation of Caddo-speaking Native Americans located between the Sabine and Trinity rivers in eastern Texas. Today the decendents of the Hasinai confederacy are enrolled in the Caddo Nation of Oklahoma.

The Spanish Conquistadors encountered the Caddo Indians around 1540 in the area of East Texas. The Caddos referred to the Spanish as "tayshas," which meant "friend" or "allies." The Spanish translation was "tejas." The Americans converted it to "Texas."







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WIKIPEDIA PROVIDES THE FOLLOWING INFORMATION...



Tejas
texasbeyondhistory.net541 × 600Search by image
Grand Xinesi (pronounced chenesi, meaning Mr. Moon), head religious leader of the Hasinai alliance. Painting by Reeda Peel, based on descriptions by Spanish explorers in the late 1600s. Courtesy of the artist.

Name

Hasinai is also spelled Hasini. The Caddo word táyshaʼ, meaning "friend," became the name of Texas. Earlier Spanish explorers called the Hasinai Tejas, old Spanish spelling—by Spanish explorers.They are also referred to as Hasini, Asenai, Asinai, Assoni, Asenay, Cenis, Senis and Sannaye.

Government

At the time of the Spanish and French encounter with the Hasinai in the 1680s the Hasinai were a centrally organized chiefdom under the control of a religious leader known as the Grand Xinesi. The Xinesi lived in a secluded house. He met with a council of councilors. The Hasinai chieftainship consisted of several sub-divisions which have been designated "contonments". Each of these was under the control of a Caddi. There was also men designated as Canahas and Chayas who helped the Caddi run the system.[3]

History

During the 17th century the Hasinai carried on trade with the Jumanos at the western Hasinai city of Nabedache.[4] Some consider the residents of Nabedache to have been a distinct people designated by that name.

Historic populations[edit source]

It is estimated that in 1520 the people who would become the Hasinai, the Kadohadacho and the Natchitoches, numbered about 250,000.[5] Over the next 250 years the population of these Caddoan-speaking peoples was severely reduced by epidemics of diseases inadvertently brought by Spanish and French coming to the Americas and spread by indigenous trading networks.

In 1690 the Hasinai numbered in the vicinity of 10,000 people or a little more. By 1720 as a result of diseases such as smallpox brought by the Spanish the Hasinai population had fallen to 2,000.[6]

See also

Notes


  1. Jump up^ 2011 Oklahoma Indian Nations Pocket Pictorial Directory. Oklahoma Indian Affairs Commission. 2011: 7. Retrieved 20 Aug 2013.

  2. Jump up^ Edmonds 27

  3. Jump up^ Gary Clayton Anderson, The Indian Southwest, 1580-1830: Ethnogenesis and Reinvention (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1999) p. 44

  4. Jump up^ Anderson, The Indian Southwest, p. 47

  5. Jump up^ Juliana Barr, Peace Came in the Form of a Woman: Indians and Spaniards in the Texas Borderlands (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2007) p. 20

  6. Jump up^ Anderson, The Indian Southwest, p. 57

References


  • Edmonds, Randlett. Nusht'uhtiʔtiʔ Hasinay: Caddo Phrasebook. Richardson, TX: Various Indian Peoples Publishing, 2003. ISBN 1-884655-0

             
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