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tsmithjohnson (tsmithjohnson) wrote,
tsmithjohnson
tsmithjohnson

ANCESTRY ANTHOLOGY: TEXAS STATE HISTORY ASSOCIATION: TEXAS DAY BY DAY:SEPTEMBER 4:MOSIER VALLEY CASE







MOSIER VALLEY SCHOOL


Black Students Attempt to Enroll in White School




On this day in 1950, students from the black community of Mosier Valley mounted a notable challenge to Texas segregation laws by attempting to enroll in the all-white Euless school.


    




Mosier Valley, in Tarrant County, was founded by freed slaves in the 1870s. Delia Woof and Joe Woods were two of the freed slaves who lived in Mosier Valley.





     






Black students attended the Mosier Valley school, part of the Euless school district. In August 1949 Euless school superintendent O. B. Powell attempted to transfer forty-six local black students to "colored" schools in Fort Worth, since busing them would be cheaper than maintaining the ramshackle Mosier Valley facility.


Mosier Valley parents, with help from the NAACP, had the district enjoined. U.S. District Judge Joe Dooley observed in 1950 that Texas laws granted students the right to be educated in their own districts and that a district's schools were supposed to be funded on an equal basis.










 

On September 4, Mosier Valley parents and 35 grade-school students entered the Euless school and tried to enroll.

A crowd of some 150 whites gathered outside, harassed photographers, and jeered as the blacks later filed out. Powell had informed the blacks that state segregation laws took precedence over other education laws.



Segregation lingered, served by a new Mosier Valley school (1953-68), but under federal duress in 1968 the Mosier Valley school closed and the Euless district was fully integrated.

***************************************************************************


Mosier Valley takes its name from a family of plantation owners who settled there in the 1850s, moving from Missouri with their slaves. Father Jeremiah K. Mosier died in Tarrant County in 1867. By 1867 sons Adam Carson and Thomas W. appeared on the list of Tarrant County voters. They had been in their precinct twelve and ten years. The brothers returned to Missouri sometime after 1867.

Another plantation family in the valley was the Lees. In 1870, six years after emancipation, Lucy Lee gave forty acres of land in the valley to former Lee plantation slaves Robert and Delsie Johnson as a wedding gift. Lee also donated two acres for Mosier Valley Cemetery. The first recorded grave is from 1870.

Soon other ex-slaves, some from the Mosier and Lee plantations, joined Robert and Delsie Johnson to start new lives as free people in Mosier Valley. Many of that first generation continued to do what they had done as slaves: They farmed, growing crops to eat and crops to sell. Residents built a church in 1874, a school in 1883. Some of the second generation left the farms to work in the big city as “domestics” and “laborers” (such as at the packing plants after 1903). Among more-recent burials in the cemetery are teachers and aircraft workers and bankers

THE PICTURE BELOW IS TAKEN  FROM A JUNETEENTH CELEBRATION IN MOSIER VALLEY





Tags: #african history/culture, #ancestryanthology, #austintexas, #black history, #texas, 1400-1900s, 1901-1919, 1920-1929, 1930-1939, 1940-1949, 1950-1959, 1960-1969, 1970-1979, 1980-1989, 1990-1999, 2000-2010, 2011-2019, african history/culture, american history/culture, austintexas, black american history/culture, civil rights issues, crime/justice dept., education-teachers issues, international/world news, naacp, political news, texas history/culture
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